Center for Innovation in Sleep Self-Management

Available Funding for Researchers

The Center for Innovation in Sleep Self-Management (CISSM) has two grant funding programs for UW investigators interested in sleep health. The programs vary in eligibility, award length, source of funding support and specific study requirements. For both awards, the principal investigator (PI) needs to be new or early stage investigator, but would consider established investigator with new focus on sleep health. Please review the information below for specific instructions regarding eligibility and application. For an overview of the funding available, click here.

For questions, please contact pilot core co-director Dr. Susan McCurry at smccurry@uw.edu.

NIH/NINR Funded CISSM Pilot Grants

This 1-year grant of $86K is supported through external funding from NIH/NINR.  The PI of the project is required to be a doctorally-prepared Registered Nurse, new or early stage investigator, or an established investigator with a new focus on sleep. Projects that are responsive to this call will: 1) integrate the CISSM Conceptual model; 2) involve self-management to improve sleep, health, well-being, and quality of life; 3) engage a population with a chronic illness; 4) integrate technology in the application; 5) incorporate NINR Common Data Elements 6) incorporate CISSM CDEs, and 7) provide data that will be used for a larger extramural study.

Since this call is for a 1-year grant, applications involving the following will be considered:

  • Intervention prototype development
  • Existing intervention prototype testing
  • Application of technology used in other areas of health that could be applied to sleep.

Investigators will be provided with ongoing mentoring by the pilot core and assistance from the technology core of the CISSM. We encourage those thinking about applying for pilot grants to discuss proposed application with pilot core directors- Drs. Sue McCurry (smccurry@uw.edu) and Carol Landis (calandis@uw.edu) in advance.

Timeline:

  • 10/16/19 – Letter of Intent due
  • 11/15/19 – Applications due
  • 6/1/20 – 5/31/21 – project dates

Click on the following links for more information:

UW-Funded Pilot Awards (RIFP) –  Not accepting applications at this time

The Center for Innovation in Sleep Self-Management (CISSM) in collaboration with the ONR pilot research program is offering 1-year grants of up to $20,000. These grants are internally funded and are available to UW faculty members. One member of the research team is required to be a Registered Nurse. Projects that are responsive to this call will: 1) engage population(s) with chronic illness; 2) have a research focus on sleep deficiency, sleep health related to population health, precision health in relation to biomarkers, or secondary data analysis of existing sleep data; 3) provide data that will be used for a larger extramural study. Indicate on the cover page of the proposal if you would like to be considered for CISSM funding.

Use of technology highly encouraged, but not required. Intervention study highly encouraged, not required.  If the proposal does not focus on an intervention, the researcher will need to provide preliminary data to support the development of an intervention study. 

Click on the following links for more information:

Current Projects

The CISSM is currently funding 4 projects in sleep health. Two projects are near completion – one on children with asthma, and the other looking at an intervention with older adults with osteoarthritis.

In June of 2018, 2 projects began – one to test the feasibility and estimate the efficacy of a novel online mindfulness meditation intervention to help pregnant women with a history of depression to self-manage sleep, and the other will develop and test the usability of a technology-based sleep intervention that provides parents with the necessary tools (self-efficacy, motivation, activation) to set goals, problem solve, and improve sleep in young children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

Click here to see the currently-funded pilot studies.